Local fire and emergency response agencies plead caution amid high fire danger

Local fire and emergency response agencies plead caution amid high fire danger
Posted on 07/02/2021

Fireworks Safety

 

Fire season is in full swing in Lane County and precautions are necessary throughout the summer and fall; however, the Fourth of July weekend brings additional challenges.

 

“If you choose to celebrate with fireworks this weekend you should do so legally and with extreme caution,” said Deputy State Fire Marshal Kristina Deschaine. “Be aware of any restrictions that may exist and make fire suppression part of your plan.”

 

For residents who purchase legal fireworks, the OSFM encourages everyone to practice the four Bs of safe fireworks use:

  • Be prepared before lighting fireworks: keep water available by using a garden hose or bucket.
  • Be safe when lighting fireworks: keep children and pets away from fireworks.
  • Be responsible after lighting fireworks: never relight a dud. Wait 15 to 20 minutes then soak it in a bucket of water before disposal.
  • Be aware: use only legal fireworks and use them only in legal places.

 

Oregon law prohibits the possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are illegal in Oregon, without a permit.

 

Know The Restrictions

 

Fire danger is high throughout our area, which means no campfires (unless otherwise noted for Forest Service-maintained campgrounds), no backyard debris burning, no use of exploding targets or tracer ammunition, and vehicle restrictions on public forest lands.

 

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) maintains an interactive website where people can check for the fire danger level in their area, as well as view the Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) and related restrictions for industrial operations on ODF-protected lands.

 

 

Evaluate Your Property

 

There are steps both homeowners and renters can take to reduce the risk of wildfire to their homes, including creating defensible space. Homeowners can start by asking themselves whether there are shrubs or trees within 15 feet of their homes or chimneys that can be pruned or removed, is there firewood stacked near their homes that can be moved, or can they use fire-resistant landscaping.

 

More information about fire prevention and defensible space can be found on the ODF website.

 

Be Prepared

 

“Every household in Lane County should be familiar with the evacuation levels and what they mean,” said Lane County Emergency Manager Patence Winningham. “And every household should have a plan for if they are evacuated, including a plan for their pets, livestock and any family members or neighbors with special needs.”

 

  • LEVEL 1 - BE READY: You should be aware of the danger that exists in their area, monitor emergency services websites and local media for information. This is the time for preparation and the precautionary movement of people with special needs, mobile property and pets and livestock.

 

  • LEVEL 2 - BE SET: You must be prepared to leave at a moment's notice. This level indicates there is a significant danger to your area. You should either voluntarily relocate outside of the affected area or, if choosing to remain, be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. You may have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at your own risk.

 

  • LEVEL 3 - GO: Leave immediately. Danger to your area is current or imminent and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be able to assist you further. DO NOT delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home. This will be the last notice you receive.

 

 

Depending upon the nature of the emergency, residents may not receive Level 1 or Level 2 notifications. In a fast-moving emergency, such as a wildfire, a Level 3 – GO NOW notification may be the first emergency alert people receive.

 

Download a printable guide at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/evacuation.